Pakistan has a serious hunger problem and it’s likely to worsen

Pakistan has a serious hunger problem and it’s likely to worsen
  • Pakistan ranks 106 among 119 countries on Global Hunger Index 2017, lagging behind India and most African countries

Pakistan is facing a serious hunger problem and the situation is likely to worsen in the coming years, according to a report by the Washington-based International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

The country is ranked at 106 among 119 developing countries in the Global Hunger Index (GHI) 2017, lagging behind India and most African states and standing at the high end of the ‘serious’ category.

The GHI score is a comprehensive index that factors in four indicators—proportion of undernourished in the population, prevalence of child mortality, child stunting and child wasting (low weight for height).

A GHI score of less than 10 means ‘low’ prevalence of hunger while a score of more than 50 indicates an ‘extremely alarming’ situation.

The stark results are in line with the Rs50 billion funds that were allocated for Prime Minister’s Global Sustainable Development Goals like ending malnutrition, child stunting, and child mortality, that were in actuality used to fulfill political agendas.

At 32.6, Pakistan has the second highest hunger score – only second to Afghanistan which scored 33.3 with an overall score of 107 on the index- the lowest score in the whole of Asia. India has the third highest score of 31.4 in Asia and has an overall ranking of 100.

The report findings suggest that about one-fifth of Pakistan’s total population remains undernourished. With such high levels of impoverishment, the matter needs to top the agenda list for policymakers. However, the government has postponed the release of data on important social indicators.

Figures for child stunting suggest 45 percent children impaired body growth due to malnourishment. This ratio has risen by approximately 5 percent in comparison to the 2006 to 2010 period.

However, the report suggests a fall in the number of children under five years of age suffering from wasting –low weight to height ratio -who now stands at slightly above one out of every ten children from 12.8 percent during 2006-2010. The child mortality rate remained stagnant at 8.1 percent under the age of five – down from 9.6percent, according to the report.

Report findings also suggest that Tharparkar region of Pakistan remains at lowest levels of poverty and malnourishment. According to a survey conducted to in 2015, the entire population lives below the international poverty line of $1.90 per person per day.

Pakistani women burn their scarves to oppose the new Islamist regime by Zia Ul Haq in 1983 https://t.co/0dJNMQXSjO — Making Histolines

Pakistani women burn their scarves to oppose the new Islamist regime by Zia Ul Haq in 1983 https://t.co/0dJNMQXSjO ||(via Twitter http://twitter.com/historylvrsclub/status/1160528304971104256)@historylvrsclub

Pakistani women burn their scarves to oppose the new Islamist regime by Zia Ul Haq in 1983 https://t.co/0dJNMQXSjO — Making Histolines

Hunger : World’s Greatest Solvable Problem — Live Laugh Love

“If you can’t feed a hundred people then feed just one” – Mother Theresa Every living being in this world feels hungry on daily basis. Food is one of our most basic need as humans , it can affect nearly everything we do. We are all aware that there are millions of people who are starving out there each day.

Image courtesy : Internet

It is commonly known that the cause of world hunger is not the shortage of food but rather the access to it. It is ridiculous that there is more fruit in a rich man’s shampoo than on the poor man’s plate.

Here are some facts :-

  • 82% of hungry people live in countries with food surpluses, not food shortages
  • One in every eight people sleeps hungry each night
  • One third of the food produced around the world is never consumed
  • Hunger kills more people each year than AIDS, Malaria and terrorism combined.
Image courtesy : Internet
🙏

Here is a wonderful organisation which aims to eliminate hunger.

Robin Hood Army was started back in August 2014 with a main focus on eliminating hunger and wastage of food. It is a initiative by Neel Ghose. Started off with Delhi, India, now serving 150 cities around the world.

Image from Robin Hood Army Website

Main Motto : ‘Serve The Hungry Citizens

This is modelled on Portugal’s Re-food Program.

How do they serve the need?

They reach out to restaurants and people, collect the surplus food and then feed those who are hungry.

At present they have +42030 volunteers (called Robins) serving nearly 150 cities around the world and have served food for 16.7 million people so far. Isn’t it amazing!

In 2016 they even started a Robin Hood Academy with an idea of teaching the street children about basic knowledge and helps them to go to school. They empowered nearly +2700 street children.

How can you help them?

By donating money ?? Nahh…. This Organisation is volunteer basedzero fund organisation.

Here’s what you can do :-

1. Be a Robin, contribute 3 hours per week, twice a month.

2. Contribute food, you can reach out to them incase you own a restaurant or you can donate a regular meal from family.

3. You can spread your knowledge by teaching the kids.

  • Their recent campaign is #Mission5 where they served 500 villages in both India and Pakistan in 5 days as act of patriotism. #Huge Salute
🙂

We should all appreciate their efforts and try to do our part to bring a change. 

Robin Hood Army says they were able to reach only 1% of the hungry and poor… Come let’s join our hands and make it 100%.

Trust me the happiness in serving the hungry is something which we cannot put into words. Our souls will be blessed.


Pakistanis split over mandatory burqas for women — The Muslim Times

Source: DW The government of Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province has reversed an order requiring female students to wear a burqa following a huge backlash. But some supporters want the veil imposed all over the country. Ziaullah Bangash, the education adviser for the region’s chief minister, said the decision was made to ensure the safety of female students following visits to several regional schools.

The notice triggered an outcry on social media, where the move was harshly criticized as a “cheap publicity feat,” oppressive and a reminder of the days when parts of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province were ruled by the Pakistani Taliban.

Authorities withdrew the order following the backlash. But many conservative Pakistanis had favored the directive and criticized its withdrawal.

Read further

Suggested reading and listening

Dr. Zia H Shah’s interview by Voice of Islam: Is Morality Objective or Subjective?

The Muslim Times Promoting Hijab rather than Burqa after Boris Johnson’s ‘Burqa Storm’

Burqa or Hijab: That is the Question?

China becomes marriage market for Pakistani girls — UPHINDIA

Gujranwala, May 7: Hundreds of women and girls from Pakistan’s Christian minority have been trafficked to China as brides in recent months as their country becomes a new marriage market for Chinese men. Chinese and Pakistani brokers are aggressively seeking out girls, sometimes even cruising outside churches to ask for potential brides, and some pastors get payments to lure impoverished parents with promises of wealth in exchange for their daughters.

Parents receive several thousand dollars and are told that their new sons-in-law are wealthy Christian converts.

The grooms turn out to be neither.

Once in China, the girls most often married against their will can find themselves isolated in remote rural regions, vulnerable to abuse, unable to communicate and reliant on a translation app even for a glass of water.


Book Review : Unmarriageable–Pride & Prejudice in Pakistan. — Salted Caramel

“Unmarriageable–Pride & Prejudice in Pakistan” by Soniah Kamal is a book I discovered at the Lahore Literary Festival in February this year. Written by a young Pakistani woman, it follows the original loyally. It manages also, to draw parallels with modern society in Pakistan and abroad. Jane Austen, perhaps the world’s first feminist, dealt with […]

Book Review : Unmarriageable–Pride & Prejudice in Pakistan. — Salted Caramel